Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Lighthouse of the Week, Nov. 23 - 29, 2014: Cove Island, Georgian Bay, Ontario


Lake Huron, the middle child of the Great Lakes, has a big bay that sticks out of it to the northeast, into Ontario, named Georgian Bay.  One of the things that Georgian Bay has is Manitoulin Island, the world's largest freshwater island.

Another thing that it has is a LOT of lighthouses.  Many of them are small (compared to the big ocean coast lighthouses).  After looking at several of them, I went with one that has a lot of tradition, and which is bigger than most, is Cove Island Lighthouse.

Georgian Bay Coastal Route - Cove Island Lighthouse

Cove Island is located offshore of the end of the northern Bruce Peninsula, where there's a town named Tobermory.

Here's two pictures of the lighthouse by Jack Salen on Flickr:


















And here's a third, photographer unknown, focusing on the tower:





More Abbey Clancy, more Ultimo


Based on some stuff I read a couple of months ago, I thought that Abigail had reached the end of her run as the Ultimo spokesmodel.  Well, apparently she's not quite done yet.


Fancy Clancy! Abbey flaunts her perfect pins in racy lingerie shoot for Ultimo

Strictly sensational! Abbey Clancy stuns in Ultimo's party perfect underwear range

She's in a bra here that supposedly adds two cup sizes.  Not that she needs it, but it looks just fine.

























The first article happened to have links to other lingerie news, so I'm passing them on right here:


http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/style/536937/Pirelli-calendar-2014

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/style/535147/Winter-lingerie-fashion

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/style/528066/Victoria-s-Secret-Lily-Aldridge

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/style/528577/Giles-Deacon-Ann-Summers


Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard are PRICELESS


Kristen Bell is incredibly cute when pregnant, and Dax Shepard is lucky to both have her like that and to have had the opportunity to make her like that.

And now, they are making some seriously cute commercials using that state to their advantage, as seen here.




Monday, November 24, 2014

Very tight in Barclays (below the top)


Crystal Palace defeated Liverpool 3-1 on Sunday, with the insurance goal coming on a nicely bent free kick.  Didn't look good early, as Liverpool scored in the first two minutes.  But the Palace came back.

Highlights:  Crystal Palace v. Liverpool 

That win makes things even tighter in the BPL, as the table shows.   Fourth (the once lowly Man U., which has crawled back to respectability) and Newcastle United in fifth both have 19 points, and the 15th and 16th spots held by Crystal Palace and Aston Villa are at 12 points.  Still a long way to go and a lot of changes are going to happen.

1(1)Chelsea






32
2(2)Southampton






26
3(3)Manchester City






24
4(4)Manchester United






19
5(5)Newcastle United






19
6(6)West Ham United






18
7(7)Swansea City






18
8(8)Arsenal






17
9(9)Everton






17
10(10)Tottenham Hotspur






17
11(11)Stoke City






15
12(12)Liverpool






14
13(13)West Bromwich Albion






13
14(14)Sunderland






13
15(15)Crystal Palace






12
16(17)Aston Villa






12
17(16)Hull City






11
18(18)Leicester City






10
19(19)Burnley






10
20(20)Queens Park Rangers






8  

The comet in 3D (and in French)


Grab your red-blue glasses;  this is a memorable 3D image.

ROLIS nous montre le noyau en relief

Here's the text, slightly mangled by Google Translate:

"Wednesday, November 12, ROLIS offered us moving images of the descent of Philae towards its landing site. The first was obtained just under 1 hour before the impact, and it showed the two lobes in perspective. Today, a relief assembly to better visualize this grand stage.

It took almost 2 minutes between the 2 images ROLIS (Rosetta Lander Imaging System) assembled to create this relief in sight. 2 min during which, Philae moved closer to the core of a little over 100 m, which allows us to admire a truly fantastic perspective.

You absolutely must find a pair of glasses with a red filter on the left and a green or blue filter on the right to appreciate the magnitude of this vision of another world. [Yeah, that's what I said.]

On the 1st level, within 3 km in Philae, the small lobe is brightly lit by the Sun which is on the right and the landing site Agilkia is practically in the center. In the distance, beyond the chaotic skyline of the small lobe, the cliffs of the large lobe appear much darker. The depth effect is accentuated by the presence in the top right of the image of a portion of one of the 3 feet of Philae which gives a human dimension to the scene.

In the lower part of the image, the small lobe, the "crater" Site B acquires a striking relief. It is all the more impressive that we know the sequence of events after 1 contact with the surface and we imagine the slow drift of Philae to the immense wall of this training, diving in a threatening darkness."

Pretty impressive for a dirty snowball, eh?








Everybody does it (a sonnet)


Yes, indeed.  Well, almost everybody.  And it's even better if you do it right.


surpassing expectations


It is the norm, the common place, the same
for each impassioned couple which creates
the basic actions in the mating frame.
For in its base simplicity it sates
the special need for procreation, yet
if it were only that, we would be just
like animals that merely only get
the cause and outcome -- not the naked trust,
the seeing and the holding mingled, merged
with clear emotion and the awesome sheer
entrancement of the shared connection.  Urged
by want and hope and love (ideally) -- near
to both depravity and godliness,
they make a meaning words cannot express.


Thursday, November 20, 2014

The sound of a historic achievement



Scientists listen to the thud of Philae hitting the comet

Yup, scientifically speaking, when Philae landed, it made a sound, which was dutifully recorded. You can listen to it at the link.


It occurred to me that next year humanity will have probes in orbit around Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, a comet, and an asteroid (Ceres). Another planetary probe will be flying by Pluto next year, too.

Impressive.